A clean ship is, well a clean ship.

L’Sgt Hester came up to me day before yesterday and asked if it was OK if her squad “squared away the ship”, as there wasn’t much for them to do, because we weren’t a big enough ship to have a proper small arms simulator range.

I thought about it, and given the normally sloppiness a scout ship “No interference with ops, stay the hell out of the Jump drive and power supply sections and have fun.” The whole squad looked like I just gave then 1000 credits each. Cpl Myrmidon bellowed “Squad Honors!”. And lo and behold they all snapped to a attention and gave me a hand salute. I returned it as best I could and said “Well, carry on then.” As they left, L’Sgt Hester turned to me with a smile “I’ll have some one give you some lessons in returning a salute. Might be important out there dealing with military run worlds.”

Lt. Urdar looked up from his console. “You have an odd crew Sr. Scout. Your have a Vargr gunnery pack that has divided the ship’s company in to 3 packs, and every one has taken it in stride. If some one says “Superior leader” or “combat leader” every one knows who you are talking about. It would not surprise me at all if wolf motif decorations start showing up in marine country soon. On the other hand, the Vargr seem to have some clue about assigned chain of command. You have a 6 term Bosom, who started in the scouts then went navy. Your IM squad is not only willing, but volunteering to do ship work. You have a full blooded Vilani pilot who isn’t hidebound and likes playing with the engineering crew. The closest thing to a “normal” crew section is Engineering, and even there they don’t seem to mind having the pilot act as an acting Engineering officer. In other words, you have a crew full scouts. I strongly suggest you look at all their ratings and assign as needed, regardless of service of origin. You know, like it was a scout crew.”

Hmm. Something to think about.

About Alex Jamison

A Sr. Scout tasked with the first IISS long range mission in the Foreven sector in 200 years
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